Maladaptive Daydreaming- Reality

reality

Let’s talk about our reality. How does your MD effect your reality? Do you ever question which is real? Reality often interrupts our daydreams but do our dreams ever interrupt our reality? How close are daydreams to hallucinations? Are we just a step away from crossing that line?

The subconscious mind does not differentiate between reality and fantasy. Now there’s a scary thought. You can program your subconscious mind by controlling your daydreaming content. Some say visualizing the same scene seven days in a row will rewire your brain. If you are having negative daydreams this could be a very bad thing. Are we programing ourselves to be victims? to fail? Those who daydream of wonderful lives, are they programming themselves to be successful? Then why are so many still unhappy and not able to get out of the dream and into reality?

Could looking closely at what we daydream about tell us what our subconscious fears are? What we need to deal with so we can move on? Maybe.

Here are the clips used in the show on reality.

Maladaptive Daydreaming. What it has done to.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjUEZZZKOL0

subconscious mind, pretend & reality

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRnm8b52XC8

Subconscious Does Not Differentiate Between Reality And Imagination

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BDSBaT9wV8

Hallucinations: The Visions and Voices of Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia

Maladaptive Daydreaming – Insomnia

Image

Does MDD interrupt your sleep? Make it hard to fall back asleep if you wake in the night? This is a real problem for me. It would seem that insomnia goes along with many mental conditions, depression, anxiety, etc. Quieting the mind is an elusive feat that few seem to master. Most suggest being careful to give yourself time to calm before bed. This would make falling asleep easier I think. But I have no problem falling asleep, just staying asleep. Doctor’s have given me sleeping pills to try. Some worked well in helping me stay groggy enough when waking to fall back asleep but the after effects in the morning made holding a job a real task. When you take a pill to go to sleep and a caffeine pill to wake up, well, you are taking too many pills. I would think lack of sleep would take less of a toll on your body then the drugs.

So, back to looking for healthier alternatives. Some say simply accepting that you have insomnia will help it. By doing so you are not so nervous about how long you will sleep or how tired you will be. Being calm and accepting is always helpful in calming the mind. What about soothing music or self hypnosis CDs as you dose off to sleep? I had someone suggest using MDD to fight the insomnia. They said they will make a daydream character go to sleep in their dream. This sounds like a good idea, if you can control your dreams to that extent. It would at least calm the mind and you may go back to sleep. If you are in the middle of an action scene then it would be much harder to go back to sleep. There in lays the problem. With my MDD the ongoing story cuts off when I fall asleep and will start back up if I wake. So whatever is happening at that time, running for my life, going through a very emotional argument, etc will start to play out. My dreams seldom involve calm relaxing scenes. But I am up to try it. So when I wake at 3 or 4 am I will try to steer my dream to a calmer action.

Insomnia and Mental Illness

Insomnia Is Linked with Mental Illness

http://www.pharmacytimes.com/publications/issue/2006/2006-01/2006-01-5160

6 Surprising Foods That Put You to Sleep

http://health.yahoo.net/experts/menshealth/6-surprising-foods-put-you-sleep

Maladaptive Daydreaming- Hypnosis

hypnosis

I went back to the councilor. Seeing that talking about the daydreams, getting it out, wasn’t moving me forward. He suggested we try something else. He suggested I try hypnosis. Now that scares me. I have heard all my life that hypnosis opens you up to demon pocession. So I have a fear of it. Strange how beliefs you grow up with can limit your openess to try new things. Now my concilour is an ordained minister and says that much of what people think you can do with hypnosis is simply false. They can’t make a sleeper agent that can be triggered to commit crimes then not remember doing it. Nope, he says that is not possible. He said if that kind of mind control was possible they would just hypnotize all the criminals in prisons and they would never commit another crime. But it doesn’t work that way. He gave me a CD, Trancework for any negative disorder, to listen to and told me to think about doing a real hypnosis sesson.

So I am reserching the use of hypnosis for mental issues. I am at the point of being willing to try just about anything. Anyone out there tried it?

http://www.hypnosic.com/hypnosis/self-hypnosis/

” Hypnosis is as normal as a daydream, and in fact a daydream is a form of hypnosis!”

http://www.hypno-facts.com/

FAQ: Is Day Dreaming Hypnosis?

“Yes. Daydreaming is a hypnotic state that is much deeper than most people would realize. Daydreaming trance is a natural normal process that everyone experiences.”

http://www.adam-eason.com/2009/11/13/the-value-of-daydreaming-and-self-hypnosis/

“We can manage the external world and daydream at the same time. To do that you have to know what you can get away with. Some part of the brain has to know. This idea is often used (though in slightly different terms) to illustrate the metaphor of conscious and unconscious functioning in hypnosis… And many people liken hypnosis and self-hypnosis to the state of daydreaming.”

http://www.netplaces.com/self-hypnosis/nine-ways-to-achieve-self-hypnosis/daydreaming-not-just-a-pastime.htm

“Daydreaming is an effective form of self-hypnosis as well as a wonderful way to program your mind to attain your goals.”

but if you daydream about things you could never possibly attain, are you programing yourself to be disappointed and depressed?

http://www.hypnosisdownloads.com/thinking-skills/stop-daydreaming

“Use hypnosis to help you stop daydreaming and focus on what you really need to do”

Daydreaming in the news

“You can spot someone who’s daydreaming from a mile away. The glazed eyes, the  slack lower lip, the hands positioned like adorable puppy paws. Never disturb  someone in this dissociative state. They may momentarily regard you as an  adversary who’s preventing them from having sex with Megan Fox and maul your  face like a brown bear.”

Read more: http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/shouts/2013/03/the-science-of-daydreams.html#ixzz2MrGctoEh